Lumbee River Conference for American Indian Women of Proud Nations
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Presenters/Speakers

2010 Conference Presenters and Speakers: To learn more, click the following links:

   
 

Kerry Bird

Kerry Bird (Sisseton-Wahpeton Dakota/Lumbee) is the Coordinator of the Tobacco Prevention Program with the NC Commission of Indian Affairs.

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Karina Bottchenbaugh

Karina Bottchenbaugh (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) is the Cherokee Youth Council Program Manager for the EBCI Cooperative Extension Center.

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Rainy Brake

Rainy Brake is a Cherokee Immersion teacher at Kituwah Academy.

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Missy Brayboy

Missy Brayboy (Lumbee) is the Director of Community Services Program with the NC Commission of Indian Affairs .

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  Dr. Ann Bullock

Dr. Ann Bullock

Dr. Ann Bullock (Minnesota Chippewa) is a Medical Consultant with Health and Medical Division of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

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Waleila Carey

Waleila Carey (Cherokee Nation) is a doctoral candidate in Interdiscipliary Studies at the University of Oklahoma.

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  Wanda Carter

Wanda Maynor Carter

Wanda Maynor Carter (Lumbee) has devoted many years of volunteer service to the American Indian community and to the larger community of Charlotte, N.C.  As an advocate for Indian people and a noted lecturer, Carter has been recognized at the local and state levels by several Indian organizations, at the national level by the National Indian Education Association and served as a N.C. delegate to the White House Conference on Indian Education. A most treasured honor that Mrs. Carter received was her recognition as one of the “American Indian Women of Proud Nations” honorees at the inaugural women’s conference.  Carter is on the management team at the Charlotte Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. She and her husband Vail reside in Charlotte and their daughter, Candice, resides in Raleigh. Mrs. Carter is a native of Pembroke, N.C., earned degrees from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Queens University in Charlotte, N.C., and is a graduate of the North Carolina Bankers Association’s School of Banking.

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Mardella Sunshine Costanzo

Mardella Sunshine Costanzo (Lumbee) has a BA in American Indian Studies from The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. She is a former Miss Indian North Carolina.

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Radonna Crowe

Radonna Crowe (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) is the manager of Healthy Cherokee with Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

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Janina DeHart

Janina DeHart is the Academic Success Program Coordinator and Advisor of Digali I' (American Indian student organization) at Western Carolina University.

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  Joyce Dugan

Joyce Dugan

Joyce Dugan (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) currently serves as the Director of Education for the Cherokee Central School System, a position she has held since 2009. Prior to returning to education she served as the Director of External Relations & Communications at Harrah’s Cherokee Casino & Hotel. Joyce served as the Principal Chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians from 1995 until 1999. Joyce was the first woman elected to serve as the Principal Chief of the Eastern Band.  

Ms. Dugan worked in the Cherokee Central School system from 1969-95 as a teacher assistant, teacher, special programs administrator, and superintendent. 

Ms. Dugan, a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, earned a BS & MS in Education at Western Carolina University, and received an honorary Doctorate of Laws from the University of NC Chapel Hill. She is a published author, public speaker and community leader.

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  Dr. Hartwell Francis

Dr. Hartwell Francis

Dr. Hartwell Francis is Director of the Cherokee Language Program at Western Carolina University.

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  Patty Grant

Patty Grant

Patty Grant (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians/Lakota) is the Manager of Analensigi with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

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  Dr. Jane Haladay

Dr. Jane Haladay

Jane Haladay is an Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

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Anita Johnson

Anita Johnson (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) was born in Tahlequah, OK in 1968 and lived there for five years. Her father transferred to Denver, CO where they lived for two years.  Her family then moved to Philadelphia, MS.  Johnson received a BA from the University of Mississippi and a JD from the University of Denver Sturm College of Law.  She and her family reside in Cherokee, NC. 

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  Marie Junaluska

Marie Junaluska

Marie Junaluska (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) is fluent in the Cherokee language and literate in the Sequoyah Syllabary. Mrs. Junaluska has served six terms as an Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Council member for Paint Town. She worked with a committee to establish the EBCI exhibit at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. She served on the board that established the Oconaluftee Institute for Cultural Arts. She assisted in establishing a Cherokee language immersion class at the Dora Reed Tribal Childcare Center. Currently, Mrs. Junaluska serves on the EBCI - CN Cherokee Langguage Consortium. She has six terribely terrific grandson and granddaughters.

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  Dr. Malinda Maynor Lowery

Dr. Malinda Maynor Lowery

Dr. Malinda Maynor Lowery (Lumbee) is an Assistant Professor of History at the Univeristy of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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  Susan Masten

Susan Masten

Susan Masten (Yurok), the past Yurok Tribal Chairperson, resides in the heart of the scenic Redwood forested coast of Northern California.  For 32 years, Susan Masten has advocated for the rights of Native People in her community and across the nation.  Her life of public service began when she was elected one of the original Presidents of the Native American Student Association at Oregon State University.  After graduation, she returned home to the Reservation and found herself on the front lines of the salmon wars, a battle to protect her people’s natural resources, cultural identity, tradition and fishing rights.  Susan Masten was instrumental in securing the Yurok’s fishing allocation rights to the Klamath River Basin, which were reaffirmed in her uncle’s U.S. Supreme Court case Mattz v. Arnet.

Susan Masten served as President of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) 1999-2001 and served as the Yurok Tribal Chairperson from 1997-2003.  NCAI is the country’s oldest and largest Tribal membership based organization representing and advocating for Tribal Governments and the rights of Native People.  Since NCAI’s foundation over half a century ago, Susan Masten is only the second woman elected President.

Prior to her NCAI Presidency, Susan Masten served as the NCAI First-Vice President from 1994 to 1996 and the NCAI Sacramento Area Vice President from 1992 to 1994.  She served as the Marketing and Promotion Specialist for United Indian Development Association and was appointed by the Secretary of the Interior to serve as a Yurok Transition Team Member to implement the Hoopa-Yurok Settlement Act, 1998-1991.  As a member of the Transition Team, Susan Masten was instrumental in organizing the Yurok Tribe.  She served on the Intertribal Monitoring Association on Indian Trust Funds; 1991-1999, served as Co-Chair for Department of the Interior Trust Reform Task Force in 2002, was the President of the Klamath Chamber of Commerce, Del Norte Democratic Central Committee Chair and elected Chair of the Klamath River Traditional Indian Fishers Committee.

Since 1976, Susan Masten has annually served as the Mistress of Ceremonies at the American Indian Film Festival in San Francisco, as well as a Festival Board Member.  She has been selected “Outstanding Young Woman of American” Humboldt County’s “Outstanding Citizen”, Del Norte County’s “Young Woman of the Year” and has been listed in numerous “Who’s Who” publications.
She is the Founder/Co-President of Women Empowering Women for Indian Nations (WEWIN) a national Native Women’s organization and a Founder/Board Member of Klamath River Early College of the Redwoods a Charter High School that provides students the opportunity to receive their AA degree with the High School Diploma. Most recently she served as the Vice President, for Union Bank of California with the Native Market Division.

Susan Masten has provided testimony before Congress, given hundreds of speeches, workshops at both college and professional events, including topics such as Tribal Sovereignty, Resource Management, Co-Management and Environmental Justice.

At home, Susan Masten is active in traditional Yurok practices including fishing on the Klamath River and caring for her family’s basket collection and dance regalia.  She lives with her husband, Leonard, and has a son, a daughter and is the proud grandmother of eight.

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  Julie O'Keefe

Julie O’Keefe

Julie O’Keefe (Osage) is a Native American entrepreneur and business woman with over 20 years of experience in projects involving a variety of products including furniture, porcelain, promotional items, educational tools and toys.  Julie’s particular expertise is in sourcing, importing, design and customization services.  Julie’s primary focus currently is assisting Native American Tribes to create and produce unique products that reflect the rich cultural history of the Native American people.

In 1995 Julie founded and was a principal in O’Keefe and O’Neil, an independent sales organization.  Julie represented nationally renowned manufacturers from around the country, promoting their goods and services to retail shops, mail order catalogs and commercial designers.  Julie regularly worked with customers to help develop customized products.

In August 2004 Julie founded The Grayhorse Group, Inc.  Grayhorse was certified in 2006 as a Native American, Woman-Owned Small Disadvantaged Business by the Small Business Administration.  With Grayhorse, Julie utilizes the worldwide network of suppliers and manufacturers she has developed over the last 20 years in custom product development, design and importing.

Grayhorse’s projects have included, among other projects:

  • The custom design and production of shawls, blankets and Native American clothing;
  • The development and supply of customized cookware and feasting dishes for the Osage Tribe of Oklahoma; and
  • The design of limited edition Tribal gifts, including Limoges trays, high-quality Tribal flags, custom presentation boxes, minted medals, silk scarves and other executive gifts.

In addition to her entrepreneurial work, Julie has a strong commitment to her community.  Julie currently services on the National Council of the National Museum of the American Indian.  From 1992-2008, Julie also served on the Board of Directors of a Washington, D.C.-based social services organization.

Julie O’Keefe was born and raised in Pawhuska, Oklahoma and is a member of the Osage Nation.  She attended Oklahoma State University.  She currently lives in Falls Church, Virginia. 

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A. Kay Oxendine

Kay Oxendine is from the Haliwa-Saponi tribe and is the mother to Rachel Ann Ensing, 21, who is a senior at UNC Chapel Hill and Johnathan Fletcher Oxendine, 11, who is now in 6th grade.

Kay has always had a love for her culture and sharing that information with all people. From the time she was a young child, she had a desire to help and try to make the world a better place. She focuses on writing inspirational stories that will give hope to many who have lost their way.

Kay wrote her first book when she was in the fifth grade. What began as a class project grew to be a lifetime passion. Photography went hand in hand with her writing, and after a few years, she was recognized for her exceptional photography, especially being able to capture the heart of the people within her community. She has worked with many pow-wows and cultural events, and was especially excited to be a part of the The Community Folklife Documentation Institute at Duke University, which enabled her to work with many other artists and photographers interestedin capturing the essence of their projects through film.

Along with her love of writing, Kay has also worked on several movies as an Associate Casting Director, specifically for extras, in which she enjoyed making everyday people have life changing experiences. To date, Kay has hosted 4 Radio programs, 3 that were specifically focusing on Native American music, one that focused on Jazz.

While working at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, Kay was named Advisor the Native American fraternity Phi Sigma Nu and the sorority Alpha Pi Omega. This role as advisor is still one that she cherishes the most in being able to work with her Native youth. She also served on the UNCP

For 3 years, Kay was named as Project Director of Strike at the Wind!, a long running outdoor drama that focused on the history of the Lumbee/Tuscarora people.

Kay has been a photographer for 20 years, and a writer for 40, since she has been a child. She is always excited when she is able to share the beauty of photography with the next generation, and especially enjoyed her most recent venture when she went to Acquinton Elementary School in King William for Career Day, where she encouraged the children to follow their dreams by doing what they loved, and when demonstrated the magic of capturing the moment with photography.

After her daughter graduated from high school, Kay moved her family back to Richmond, VA, where she was born and raised. She followed her love of writing and began working at The Country Courier as Editor in 2007. In 2010, she began her own newspaper, 360 View, which reaches over 16,000 households and is also online. This move has definitely been a challenge for Kay, but it is one that she has never regretted. She is enjoying being able to focus on the rural splendor of her community and is so thankful that she can bring her community to life, thru her pen.

Kay also works closely with several people in her Native community on projects that will inspire. She is currently on the board of Native American Advocates Against Violence, in which she MC’d their women’s conference last year, and is very active among the Native community in VA. In 2010, she received an International Gold medal for the production of her commercial for the 2009 Great American Indian Expo in Richmond, VA.

Kay still has the faith that her writing can change and inspire people and seeks stories that will not only educate but inspire, most specifically focusing on regular people, all of whom make the world go round.

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Kim Adrienne Pevia

Kim Pevia (Lumbee) is a native of Baltimore, MD, whose more than 30 year career has been divided between corporate employment and self employment. The first 15 years included climbing the corporate ladder in the cruise industry and achieving the position of General Manager for a cruise company in Baltimore, MD.

The next 15 years were dedicated to entrepreneurship. Pevia started her own personal, professional and corporate development business in Ft. Lauderdale. She also developed a love for real estate. She moved to Red Springs, NC in 2006 to be near her family.

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Hannah E. Smith

Hannah Smith (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) was born in Cherokee, NC in 1971. She lived on the 3200 Acre Tract until the age of 12 when she moved to Chapel Hill, NC with her family while her mother attended medical school at UNC. She began her undergraduate studies at Florida Southern College in Lakeland, FL and transferred to and graduated from East Carolina University in Greenville, NC with a B.S. in Child Development and Family Relations. She received her Juris Doctor at University of New Mexico School of Law in 2000. 

Smith's legal career has consisted of private practice in the areas of family law, criminal defense and civil litigation and since 2004 as as a tribal attorney for the EBCI. 

Even more challenging than her legal career is her position  as a mother and a wife. She has a 14 year old son,  6 year old daughter and a husband.  

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Natalie Smith

Natalie Smith (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) was born on the Qually Boundary and grew up in Chapel Hill, NC. She lived in the southwestern United States. Smith graduated from Western Carolina University. She started LIFT Contemporary Inc. in 2004 (a non-profit contemporary arts organization) as well as Tribal Grounds Coffee LLC (cafe and roastery). Currently she is focusing on reinstituting LIFT Contemporary Inc with other women artists and strengthening Tribal Grounds Coffee LLC through gaining wholesale clients in the southeast.

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  Sallie Arch Smoker

Sallie Arch Smoker

Sallie Arch Smoker (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) was born and raised in the Wolftwon Community. Mrs. Smoker's parents and grandparents spoke Cherokee and that is the only language she knew as a girl. She started speaking English in the first grade. Currently, Mrs. Smoker serves ont eh EBCI-CN Cherokee Language Consortium. She has been studying and teaching the Cherokee language and culture professionally for the last three years. Mrs. Smoker has four granddaughtes and one grandson and she is working dilligently with them on the Cherokee language.

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Sarah M. Sneed

Sarah Sneed (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) graduated from the University of Colorado at Boulder, Magna cum Laude in History, in 1982.  In 1985, she was conferred a Juris doctorate from Harvard Law School.  Sneed has worked in various capacities with Indian tribes throughout her career.

Since returning to the Qualla Boundary in 2002, Sneed has been honored to be involved in a number of special projects to preserve the history of the Eastern Band of Cherokees, including the development of an exhibition displayed at the 2008 Tribal Fair, Boarding School Experiences of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

She resides in the Birdtown Community.

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  Nannie Taylor

Nannie Taylor

Nannie Taylor (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) grew up speaking Cherokee in the Wolftown Community. She has been studying and teaching Cherokee language and culture all her life. Currently, Ms. Taylor serves on teh EBCI-CN Cherokee Language Consortium. She teacher her grandchildren. Sher grandson Tsutsu prefers Cherokee language and her grandson Tawodi writes Cherokee language. Her grandson Ernest listen to his grandmother and to his great grandmother. Ms. Taylor hopes to continue to study and teach Cherokee language as long as the grass is green and the water is flowing.

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Dr. Molly Tovar

Dr. Molly Tovar (Comanche) is the Director of the Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, MO.

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Jonnie Walkingstick

Jonnie Walkingstick (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) is a teacher at Cherokee Elementary School in Cherokee, NC.

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  Nicole Wheeler

Nicole Wheeler

Nicole Wheeler (Comanche/Hispanic Descent), is the co-founder and CEO of Tovar & Wheeler Consulting, LLC.  She is currently co-editing A Cup of Cappuccino for the Entrepreneur’s Spirit: American Indian Women’s Edition and partnering to develop a center for excellence to serve minority students at a state university.

Ms. Wheeler’s work and research has lead to extensive travel throughout Latin America and Polynesia.  Her research and professional experiences include:  The Advancement of Maori Opportunity, Hamilton, New Zealand; Center for Disability Studies at University of Hawaii-Manoa, Honolulu Hawaii; and the Punta Cana Ecological Foundation/Cornell University, Punta Cana, Dominican Republic.  Recently, she attended an International Expert Dialogue at The Hague on the United Nation’s Millennium Development goals and how they pertain to Indigenous peoples.  Ms. Wheeler has presented at national, state and local events, such University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill’s New Directions in American Indian Research and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society’s Annual National Conference.  She is published in numerous journals, newspapers, and magazines.

Ms. Wheeler has worked at non-profits and Universities for the past six years aiding in student services, curriculum development and leadership.  She is currently a consultant focusing on strengthening organizations’ capacities for leadership development through sustainable initiatives.  Additionally, she serves on an advisory council for the Albuquerque Academy, is involved in animal rescue, volunteers for political campaigns and is a member of the Native American Caucus.

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Last Updated: Friday, May 6, 2011