Lumbee River Conference for American Indian Women of Proud Nations
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Presenters/Speakers

2009 Conference Presenters and Speakers: To learn more, click the following links:

   
  Cherry Beasley

Cherry Beasley

Cherry Beasley, Lumbee, is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

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Roseanna Sneed Belt

Roseanna Sneed Belt, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, is the Director of the Cherokee Center at Western Carolina University.

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Sharon H. Berrun

Sharon Harris Berrun is a member of the Haliwa-Saponi Indian Tribe of Hollister, North Carolina. She currently serves as the Youth Services Director for the Haliwa-Saponi Tribe and has been employed in that position for fifteen (15) years. As the Youth Services Director; Mrs. Berrun is responsible for the Teen Tobacco Prevention and Cessation program, the Saponi Warriors Against Tobacco and Tribal Youth Leadership Groups, the Cultural Arts program, Cultural/Dance Classes, and the tribes annual Summer Day Camp. Sharon has been involved in our culture since the age of two years old and has served in many different capacities within the circle, including Head Lady Dancer, Head Judge, and Mistress of Ceremonies. She is a Southern Traditional Dancer. Sharon has also served as an ambassador for her tribal as Miss Haliwa-Saponi 1990-91. As Miss Haliwa-Saponi, she competed for and was crowned Miss Indian North Carolina 1991-92; the first Haliwa-Saponi Indian to hold the state title. Sharon currently resides in Warrenton, NC with her husband Octavio Berrun and their two year old daughter Amilia.

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Kerry Bird

Kerry Bird, Sisseton-Wahpeton Dakota/Lumbee, is the American Indian Teen Tobacco Youths Prevention Program Grant Coordinator with the NC Commission of Indian Affairs.

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  Stephen Boyd

Dr. Stephen B. Boyd

Stephen Boyd grew up in Tennessee and has lived in Boston, MA; Germany, and North Carolina. He teaches the history of Christianity and Christian Thought at Wake Forest University. He has been in a weekly men’s group for 20 years and has written a book on the relationship between religious faith and masculinity, The Men We Long To Be (HarperSanFrancisco 1995).

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Brandi Brooks

Brandi L. Brooks currently serves as the Program Coordinator of the American Indian Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she received her degree in Communications Studies in 2007. Her desire for developing and coordinating various student and parent programs in college eventually led to a deep passion for fundraising and event planning. As a former President of the Carolina Indian Circle, she participated in the creation and development of the American Indian Center. She is a member of the Lumbee Tribe and is originally from Laurinburg, NC.

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  Christy Buchanan

Christy Buchanan

Christy Buchanan is a Professor of Psychology at Wake Forest University.  She received her BA from Seattle Pacific University and her PhD in Developmental Psychology from the University of Michigan.  She does research on adolescent development in the family, examining how adolescent-parent relationships, parenting practices, and adolescents’ well-being are influenced by factors such as family structure, parents' and children's beliefs and expectations about adolescence, culture and ethnicity.  She has authored several journal articles and book chapters, and is co-author of Adolescents after Divorce, published by Harvard University Press.

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Randi Byrd

Randi Byrd, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Descent, is the Program Assistant at the American Indian Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Connie Canady

Connie Canady is a member of the Lumbee Tribe.

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  Wanda Carter

Wanda Maynor Carter

Wanda Maynor Carter has devoted many years of volunteer service to the American Indian community and to the larger community of Charlotte, N.C.  As an advocate for Indian people and a noted lecturer, Carter has been recognized at the local and state levels by several Indian organizations, at the national level by the National Indian Education Association and served as a N.C. delegate to the White House Conference on Indian Education. A most treasured honor that Mrs. Carter received was her recognition as one of the “American Indian Women of Proud Nations” honorees at the inaugural women’s conference.  Carter is on the management team at the Charlotte Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. She and her husband Vail reside in Charlotte and their daughter, Candice, resides in Raleigh. Mrs. Carter is a native of Pembroke, N.C., earned degrees from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Queens University in Charlotte, N.C., and is a graduate of the North Carolina Bankers Association’s School of Banking.

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  Katsi Cook

Katsi Cook

Katsi Cook , Wolf Clan Mohawk, is an Aboriginal Midwife, mother of six and grand-mother of seven. Since 1983, she has conducted award-winning community-driven environmental justice health research in her home community of Akwesasne, one of many member communities of the Six Nations Iroquois Confederacy, located along the St. Lawrence River between northern New York and western Quebec/eastern Ontario. In 1984, she initiated the Akwesasne Mother’s Milk Project, developing connectivity among community members, health care providers and research scientists. Having been honored as a “Success Story” in 1991 at the Global Assembly of Women and the Environment, Miami, Florida, the Akwesasne Mother’s Milk Project evolved into the First Environment Project which brought together Native American women’s leadership in reproductive and environmental health issues, conducting outreach into Native American communities in the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem. From 1992-1996, Katsi served as a member of the International Joint Commission Science Advisory Board’s Workgroup on Ecosystem Health. In building community capacity through developing an environmental justice network at the state and federal levels, Katsi served a four year appointment(1994-1998) as a Lecturer in the Department of Environmental Health and Toxicology at the University at Albany School of Public Health, where she was Principal investigator for First Environment Communications , one of three Environmental Justice: Partnerships for Communication national demonstration projects funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) of the NIH. As a Visiting Fellow at Cornell University’s American Indian Program in those same years, Katsi focused her work on environmental justice issues within the communities of the Six Nations Iroquois and is a founding member of Akwesasne Task Force on the Environment and Haudenosaunee Environmental Task Force. Her work in ecosystem recovery focuses on socio-cultural systems and human health issues. She served as founding Aboriginal Midwife for the Six Nations Birthing Centre at Six Nations, Ontario, funded by the Ministry of Health of Ontario’s Aboriginal Healing and Wellness Strategy.

For her work in Aboriginal midwifery and Environmental Justice, she was a 2001 honoree at the New York Open Center 2001 Awards Dinner in New York City, October 29, 2001. In 1999, she received the Calver Award from the Environment Section of the American Public Health Association, a 1998 Annual Award from the New York State Labor and Environment Network at the 20th Anniversary of Love Canal Conference, 1997 Green Medicine Award from Bioneers, and is a 1993 Bannerman Fellow of Tides Foundation. Katsi has served as the 2001 Dr. T.J. Murray Visiting Scholar in Medical Humanities at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Co-author of “Holistic Risk-Based Environmental Decision Making: A Native Perspective” published in April 2002 of the Environmental Health Perspectives, Katsi is a 2004 - 2005 recipient of an Indigenous Knowledge Cultural Researcher Award from the Indigenous Health Research Development Program at McMaster University with which she is writing part of a community and culture based Aboriginal Midwifery Education curriculum. She is also Mohawk Council of Akwesasne Representative to the Local Working Group in a research project, Integrated Maternity Care for Rural and Remote Communities in partnership with Ryerson University Midwifery Education Program.

In addition, Katsi is the Maternal and Child Health Coordinator for United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) Tribal Epidemiology Center in conducting qualitative studies in 24 Tribal Nations over the next three years, negotiating respectful models of research practice based in principles of environmental justice.

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Karen Coronado

Karen Coronado is a member of the Lumbee Tribe.

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Vibrina Coronado

Vibrina Coronado, Lumbee, is a consultant, research and writer.

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Margaret Crites

Margaret Crites has served as the Executive Director of the Rape Crisis Center of Robeson County since 1996. She has served with the agency since January 1991. The agency has provided services to about 4,500 victims of sexual violence since opening.

Margaret has a Bachelor of Arts in Public Policy and a certificate in Women's Studies from The Univeristy of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She earned a certificate in Non-Profit Management from Duke University and a certificate in Victim Assistance from the US Department of Justice.

Margaret has served two terms as the President of the North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Assault.  She has also served on several local boards, including Horizon Point Child Advocacy Center, the Humane Society of Robeson County, and the Department of Social Services Child Sexual Abuse Task Force.  She is currently serving on the North Carolina Sexual Violence Prevention Team, the Intersectionality of Oppressions Work Group, and the North Carolina Council for Women/Domestic Violence Commission’s Advisory Committee.

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Cindy Edwards

Cindy Edwards, a Robeson County native, has worked with the Southeastern Family Violence Center for over 5 years. She began her work with the Center as a UNCP volunteer in 2004. Since that time she has served in numerous capacities including Crisis Counselor and Shelter Advocate. In 2007, she became the agency’s Director.

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  Mary Ann Elliott

Mary Ann Elliott

Mary Ann Elliott, entered semi-retirement October 2007 as Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Arrowhead Global Solutions, Inc., following the sale of the company to CapRock Holdings a private firm headquartered in Houston, TX in May 2007.  Ms. Elliott is a recognized expert in mobile satellite services and international private satellite networks. Arrowhead was founded January 1991, as a Native American, Woman-Owned, Small Business.  Arrowhead provides end to end telecommunication solutions, information technology, and professional support services to the federal government with “On Target Quality Solutions.”  Mary Ann is a frequent lecturer and author on the subject of commercial satellite services. Ever the entrepreneur, since 2003, she has been instrumental in the founding of three new companies where she is either Chairman of the Board or on the Executive Board of Directors.  Each of the three new firms is growing successfully with revenues ranging from $4 to $24 million in 2008. 

Arrowhead experienced dramatic growth under Mary Ann’s leadership.  Founded in1991 in the basement of her townhouse, a staff of one, and first year revenues of $64 thousand the company grew to $11M in its first decade.  Following the events of September 11, 2001 the company’s revenues have grown from $15M in 2001 to $100M in 2005.  Arrowhead is a trusted contractor for the US Military, Intelligence Community and the Department of Homeland Security.  The firm won 3 contracts valued at over $1 Billion with 10 year periods of performance.  Arrowhead’s headquarters are in Northern Virginia with field offices in 13 states and two international locations. 

Ms. Elliott worked across the gamut of the wireless communications revolution.  She made her entry into the field working as the first female with Motorola in the traditional wireless terrestrial market and then moved into the new technology field of navigation and communication by satellite.  Prior to founding Arrowhead, she held management positions with COMSAT International, Contel's American Satellite Division, Talon Technology and Navidyne.

Ms. Elliott is active in numerous professional organizations including the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Associations (AFCEA), Women in Technology and Society of Satellite Professionals.  She was given the Life Time Achievement Award by Women in Aerospace in 1995, named among the forty most influential people in global defense, aerospace and national security by Defense Daily, one of only two women so honored.  Ms. Elliott was honored by the Virginia Foundation for Women in History in March 2003. She was also nominated for Satellite Executive of the Year in 2003, the first female nominee in this awards 18 year history.  Ms. Elliott was inducted into the Society of Satellite Professionals (SSPI) “Satellite Hall of Fame” in 2007 for her work in creating demand and acceptance by the US Military for the use of commercial satellite capabilities.  She is only the second female to ever be so honored by SSPI.  In 2009 she received an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the University of North Carolina at Pembroke for her life and professional accomplishments, and ongoing support to the university and for students in financial need.

Mary Ann’s heritage includes the Native American Tuscarora and Lumbee Indian tribes of Robeson County, North Carolina.  She has three children and four grandchildren and currently resides outside of Washington, DC in the Northern Virginia area.  Mary Ann is also known for her generosity in assisting those less fortunate.  When her children were growing up the home was known as the local spot where children and pets would be taken in and cared for.  In 2004, she sponsored two African refuges, assisting them in settling in this great nation with housing and jobs.  Ms. Elliott established the Morningstar Foundation in 2008 to support educational initiatives, children’s charities, and medical research.

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  Jane Haladay

Dr. Jane Haladay

Jane Haladay is an Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

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  Suzan Harjo

Suzan Harjo

Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne & Hodulgee Muscogee) is a poet, writer, lecturer, curator and policy advocate, who has helped Native Peoples recover more than one million acres of land. She has developed key laws in four decades to promote and protect Native nations, sovereignty, arts, cultures and languages, including the 1978 American Indian Religious Freedom Act, the 1989 National Museum of the American Indian Act, the 1990 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act and the 1996 Executive Order on Indian Sacred Sites. She was Executive Director of the National Congress of American Indians and NCAI Fund (1984-89), Special Assistant for Indian Legislation & Liaison in the Carter Administration and Principal Author of the 1979 President’s Report to Congress on American Indian Religious Freedom. She served on the Native American Policy Committee for Sen. Barack Obama’s presidential campaign and as an Advisor to the Transition in 2008-2009.

Ms. Harjo is President of The Morning Star Institute, a national Native rights organization founded in 1984 for Native Peoples’ traditional and cultural advocacy, arts promotion and research. A leader in cultural protection and stereotype busting, Morning Star sponsors the Just Good Sports project, organizes the National Prayer Day for Sacred Places and coordinated The 1992 Alliance (1990-1993). Ms. Harjo is one of seven Native people who filed the 1992 landmark lawsuit, Harjo et al v. Pro Football, Inc., regarding the name of the Washington football team. They won in 1999, when a three-judge panel unanimously decided to cancel federal trademark protections for the team’s disparaging name. The District Court reversed their victory in 2003; the case is now before the U.S. Court of Appeals. Her essay, Fighting Name-Calling, is published in Team Spirits (University of Nebraska Press, 2001). She also wrote the Just Good Sports chapter in For Indigenous Eyes Only: A Decolonization Handbook (SAR Press, 2005).   

A Founding Trustee of the National Museum of the American Indian (1990-1996), she began work in 1967 that led to the NMAI, to repatriation laws and to reform of national museum policies dealing with Native Americans, and was a Trustee of NMAI’s predecessor museum and collection in New York City (1980 to 1990). Chair of NMAI’s first Program Planning Committee, she was Principal Author of the NMAI Policies on Exhibits (1994), Indian Identity (1993) and Repatriation (1991). Director of the 2004-2005 NMAI Native Languages Archives Repository Project, whose report, “Native Language Preservation,” was distributed to tribal leaders on CD in 2007. She served on the NMAI Symposia Committee (2004-2006) and was Moderator/Host for the NMAI Native Writers Series’ first three seasons (2004-2007). 

Curator of “American Icons Through Indigenous Eyes” for the District of Columbia Arts Center (DC/AC-2007), she is currently Guest Curator for exhibitions on treaties for the NMAI and the University of Pennsylvania Museum. Guest Curator of the Peabody Essex Museum’s 1996-1997 major exhibition, her curatorial essay appears in the show’s award-winning catalogue, Gifts of the Spirit: Works by Nineteenth-Century & Contemporary Native American Artists (Eitlejorg Museum, 1998). She curated “Healing Art,” the 1998-2000 exhibit at the American Psychological Association in Washington, D.C., and the 1992 “Visions from Native America,” the first Native art exhibit ever shown in the U.S. Senate and House Rotundas. She curated three print gallery exhibits for Native Americas Journal: “Native Images in American Editorial Cartoons” (2001); “New Native Warrior Images in Art” (2001); and “Identity Perspectives by Native Artists” (2002), and “9-11 Art by Native Artists” for Native Peoples (2002). A Banff Centre Aboriginal Program Council Member (2005-present), she co-founded Indian Art Northwest and chaired its Judges Committee (1997-2000); judged the first Sundance Native American Film Initiative; and co-chaired “Our Visions: The Next 500 Years” (Taos, 1992).

The first Vine Deloria, Jr. Distinguished Indigenous Scholar (University of Arizona, 2008), she was awarded unprecedented back-to-back residency fellowships by the School of Advanced Research in Santa Fe, where she was the 2004 Dobkin Artist Fellow for Poetry and a 2004 Summer Scholar. She chaired SAR Seminars on Native Identity and on Native Women’s Cultural Matters, and a 2006 Seminar on U.S. Civilization and Native Identity Policies at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. A 1996 Stanford University Visiting Mentor and a 1992 Dartmouth College Montgomery Fellow, she was the first Native American person selected for the honor by Stanford’s Haas Center for Public Policy and the first Native woman chosen for the prestigious Montgomery Fellowship Award. One of More Magazine’s “Alpha Women 2004: The Year’s Brightest and Best - Heroines” for protecting sacred places, she keynoted the Arizona State University College of Law 2003 Symposium on AIRFA at 25 (Wicazo Sa Review, 2004) and the Evergreen State College-Morning Star AIRFA at 30 at Suquamish Nation (2008). 

A veteran broadcaster, award-winning columnist and Founding Co-Chair of The Howard Simons Fund for American Indian Journalists, Ms. Harjo served as “Seeing Red” Producer and Drama & Literature Director for Pacifica’s WBAI-FM Radio, New York City (late-1960s to mid-1970s), and as News Director of the American Indian Press Association. A 2000 JAWS keynoter and past NAJA board member, she served on UNITY Journalists of Color’s Brain Trust and as an organizer of UNITY ’04 in D.C., ’99 in Seattle and ’94 in Atlanta. Columnist for Indian Country Today (2000-2008), she wrote the Foreword, “Camp Criers Speaking Across the Generations,” and 11 columns featured in America Is Indian Country (Fulcrum Publishing, 2005). Her essay, Redskins, Savages and Other Indian Enemies: An Historical Overview of American Media Coverage of Native Peoples, is in Images of Color: Images of Crime (2005).

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  Ronda Jones Hughes

Ronda D. Jones Hughes

Since her youth, Ronda has been an active and visible advocate for American Indian children and the preservation of American Indian culture. As a young advocate Ronda attended American Indian conferences through the United States representing her tribe and other tribes in the state of North Carolina. In 1998, Ronda was crowned Miss Indian North Carolina. After receiving her Bachelors and then her Masters at Rutgers University, one of the leading schools of the Social Work profession, Ronda decided to move back home and tackle relentlessly the growing influx of American Indian children who are in custody of the state and/or are in non-Native placements. It is this passion that lead Ronda to establish Red Path to serve as a placement agency as well as a training facility for American Indian foster parents. Through her mission, Ronda successfully collaborates with NC Department of Social Services, NC Commission of Indian Affairs, and the Lumbee Tribe of NC. Ronda is a member of the NC Indian Child Welfare Task Force, National Association of Social Workers, Red Hawk Indian Arts Council of New York, a certified MAPP Trainer, as well as Provisional Licensed Clinical Social Worker. She is also a member of the Lumbee Tribe. Ronda is the wife of John Milton Hughes, Jr. from Cape Cod who is a member of the Wampanoag Tribe. Ronda and her husband travels throughout Indian country to promote American Indian preservation.

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Amanda Hynes

Amanda Hynes is the Wellness Coordinator for Southeastern Regional Medical Center.

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Barbara Locklear

Barbara Locklear, Lumbee, is a teaching artist and storyteller.

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  Lakota John Locklear

Lakota John Locklear

Lakota John Locklear, Lumbee/Lakota, is a musician.

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  Layla Locklear

Layla Locklear

Layla Locklear, Lumbee/Lakota, is Miss NCNAYO (North Carolina Native American Youth Organization) 2009-10.

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  Norma Marti

Norma Marti

Norma Martí works at the NC Division of Public Health in the Children & Youth Branch as a Public Health Consultant focusing on outreach and enrollment of under-represented populations in the state’s child health insurance programs:  Health Check (Medicaid) and NC Health Choice (S-CHIP). She promotes access to quality medical home and preventive and primary care services to enrolled children. She assists the branch with development of culturally competent outreach and educational materials focusing her efforts in developing partnerships at the state, regional, and local levels that address elimination of health care disparities. The Taino & Caribs people were part of her roots (from the island of Puerto Rico).

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  Kimberly Oxendine Owen

Kimberly Oxendine Owen

Kimberly Owen is a graduate student at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.  She is receiving her Masters in Christian Counseling with a concentration in Marriage and Family Therapy. She will be starting an internship with Carolinas Medical Hospital in the Family Center this fall.

Kimberly’s passion is serving in leadership within her church.  She leads a Divorce Care for Kids, counseling program for the Women’s Ministry and she and her husband lead a Marriage Ministry.

Kimberly believes true health is feeding your mind with God’s inerrant words of truth, supplying your body with proper nutrition and exercise and nourishing the soul by taking time in serving others.

Kimberly resides in Huntersville with her three children and husband Wes Owen.  They have been married for 13 years.

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Monica Locklear Oxendine

Monica Locklear Oxendine is Lumbee who completed her grade school years in Raleigh and Charlotte. She currently lives in Pembroke NC. She received BS in Community Health Education from UNC-P 1998.  She then went on to pursue her nursing degree receiving a BS in nursing from the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) 2002 followed by a Masters in Nursing with a focus on midwifery from MUSC 2004. She has been a nurse midwife at Carolinas Women’s Center for 3 ½ years. She is currently an active member of the American college of Nurse Midwives. She is married to Dewayne Oxendine and they have one daughter, Savannah Rayne.

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Kim Adrienne Pevia

Kim Pevia is a native of Baltimore, MD, whose more than 30 year career has been divided between corporate employment and self employment. The first 15 years included climbing the corporate ladder in the cruise industry and achieving the position of General Manager for a cruise company in Baltimore, MD.

The next 15 years were dedicated to entrepreneurship. Pevia started her own personal, professional and corporate development business in Ft. Lauderdale. She also developed a love for real estate. She moved to Red Springs, NC in 2006 to be near her family.

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  Lillian Sparks

Lilillian A. Sparks

Lillian Sparks, a Lakota woman of the Rosebud and Oglala Sioux Tribes, currently serves as the Executive Director of the National Indian Education Association. The NIEA, located in Washington, DC, was founded in 1969 to give American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians a voice in their struggle to improve access to education opportunities.

Prior to joining NIEA, Lillian Sparks was a staff attorney with the National Congress of American Indians where she worked on international indigenous rights, sacred sites and religious protection, and issues related to youth and healthcare. Miss Sparks, a former Miss Indian World, was named as one of 7 young leaders in Indian Country. Miss Sparks received her B.A. in Political Science from Morgan State University, located in her hometown of Baltimore, MD, and her Juris Doctorate from Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, DC.

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Joanna Mounce Stancil

Joanna Mounce Stancil is Shawnee/Cherokee from the Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma. She now serves as the Senior Marketing Specialist for the U.S. Small Business Administration. Part of her responsibilities is to support SBA’s Office of Native American Affairs. Prior to joining SBA in December of 2008 she was the American Indian and Alaska Native Program Manager for the U.S. Census Bureau. Joanna has more that 20 years experience as a small business owner providing consulting services to the federal government, and tribal governments and their enterprises; including gaming. She has worked with more than half of the 562 federally recognized-tribes, most of the 60 + state recognized tribes, and the major American Indian and Alaska Native organizations. She is also a journalist and is the first American Indian to own a television production company and news bureau in the Nation’s capital.

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  Rose Stremlau

Dr. Rose Stremlau

Jane Haladay is an Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

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  Christy Strickland

Christy Strickland

Christy Strickland is employed with the NC Cooprative Extension.

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  Mary Kim Title

Mary Kim Titla

Mary Kim Titla, San Carlos Apache, is a public relations consultant, motivational speaker, freelance journalist and publisher of Native Youth Magazine.com, an award winning e-magazine that showcases the talents and lifestyles of Native youth in the U.S. and Canada.

Titla, a 20-year veteran TV News Reporter, spent most of her career working for NBC affiliate stations in Arizona covering politics, the environment, energy independence, economy, border security, education, substance abuse and many other issues. In 2007 she was inducted into the Cronkite Hall of Fame at Arizona State University.

In 2006 her e-zine received a First Place Award from the Native American Journalists Association for Best Website (among national Native websites), a First Place Award from the Arizona Press Women’s Association for Best Website Creation/Development and Third Place from the National Federation of Press Women (among national mainstream websites).

In addition Titla has won numerous awards for her reporting including First Place Awards from the Associated Press, Arizona Press Club and the Native American Journalists Association. She’s also been the recipient of many awards for her work with Native American and Alaskan Native youth including the Ira Hayes Honorable Warrior Award. She has a Bachelor’s degree in Journalism from the University of Oklahoma and a Master of Mass Communication from Arizona State University.

As former Chairperson of the Board of Trustees for United National Indian Tribal Youth, Inc. (UNITY), Titla has been a staunch advocate for youth and has testified before congress on youth related issues. In addition, she’s helped raise nearly $1 million dollars for the non-profit organization over the last 12 years. She’s been an active member of the Native American Journalists Association, Arizona Press Women, San Carlos Gilson Wash Enterprise Board and the Point of Pines Cattle Association.

Titla has been in demand as a speaker around the country addressing such topics but not limited to Native youth leadership, youth related issues, environmental stewardship, natural resources conservation, higher education, motherhood, Apache culture, and voting rights.

While she left her TV new job almost three years ago, Titla continues her work as a freelance journalist having articles published in Indian Country Today and on video for Northwest Indian News.

In September of 2008, Titla lost her bid as a Democratic candidate for the Arizona Congressional District 1 seat but she finished a strong 2nd place out of 4 contenders. As someone who experienced humble beginnings, she’s determined more than ever to help address issues affecting Native American families. Titla is married to John Mosley, Assiniboine/Paiute. They have three sons including one who is enlisted in the U.S. Army.

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  Ruth Dial Woods

Dr. Ruth D. Woods

Ruth D. Woods, Lumbee, is the Executive Director of Sacred Pathways, Inc.

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Last Updated: Friday, May 6, 2011